Comprehensible Input – How Clozemaster Mirrors Natural Acquisition

Researchers have long studied the processes of child language acquisition and have applied these theories to second language acquisition. In the 1970s and 1980s, linguist Stephen Krashen proposed a series of hypotheses about language acquisition. He argues that the comprehensible input to which learners are exposed is of primary importance. How does a child learn …

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Common French Phrases Travelers Will Actually Use

If you’re interested in learning French, there are many ways to adopt the language for free. But when you actually travel to France, you may start to hear conversational language, slang terms and expressions that you aren’t quite familiar with. The good news? Taking time to learn conversational French can boost your confidence and improve …

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The Social Benefits of Learning a Language

The English language, with its modest origins on a rainy island in the North Atlantic, has always punched above its weight. The English language was the British Empire’s most successful export. Its adoption as the first language in the United States played a major role in rise to prominence. With the advent of the internet, …

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German Definite Articles Der, Die, Das: Everything You Need to Know about Definite Articles in German

When you first start learning German, you might feel quite upbeat and optimistic, thinking “Ok, this doesn’t look that hard, some of it is quite similar to English, like “Good morning” = “Guten Morgen” or “Monday” = “Montag”, I can do this!”. What’s an article? And then you come across a little something called ARTICLES …

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The Complete Guide to Polish Imperative Verbs

Polish imperative verbs are special verb forms whose purpose is issuing commands, giving advice, making requests and many others. In English, you would usually use the infinitive verb form, as in “Clean your room.” Alternatively, the verb “to let” is used to make imperative-like suggestions, usually as “let’s”: “Let’s go for a walk.” In Polish, you have to …

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Polish Verbs of Motion “iść”, “jechać”, and Other Related Verbs

Many learners find Polish verbs of motion to be one of the most confusing aspects of the language. And no wonder: to use them correctly, you need to pay attention to a bunch of distinctions that do not even exist in English. Let’s try to make them less scary by analyzing some of their defining …

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Polish Relative Pronouns “który“ and “jaki” Made (Relatively) Easy

Który and jaki as interrogative pronouns The Polish pronouns który and jaki – mostly translated as which or what – have several uses. Probably the most straightforward one is asking questions. Below are two example sentences with który and jaki as interrogative pronouns: Który samochód podoba ci się bardziej, mój czy Toma? (“Which car do you like more, mine or Tom’s?”) …

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The Polish Negative Pronouns “nikt” and “nic”: A Short Guide

The Polish negative indefinite pronouns nikt and nic are roughly equivalent to the English negative pronouns nobody (or no one) and nothing. As the name would suggest, the pronouns are used to negate things or declare their non-existence. Here are some sentences with nikt and nic in context: Nikt nie jest doskonały. (“Nobody is perfect.”) …

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The Polish Interrogative Pronouns “kto” and “co” and Related Pronouns

The Polish interrogative pronouns kto and co correspond to the English question words who and what, so their main purpose is asking questions about personal (human) and impersonal agents. Kto wygrał konkurs? (“Who won the contest?”) Co jeszcze widziałeś? (“What else did you see?”) On a basic level, Polish interrogative pronouns are very much like …

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The Beginner’s Guide to Polish Reflexive Pronouns and Verbs

The way reflexive pronouns work in Polish might not seem too intuitive to an English speaker. After all, English reflexive pronouns – words like oneself, himself, yourselves etc. – are only used in very specific contexts. On a basic level, reflexive pronouns are used to signal that the object of a clause is the same …

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